What did Proto-Maritime sound like?

How people used to talk on Mohai

Proto-Maritime is reconstructed as having 23 phonemes. It was characterised by four points of vowel articulation, a lack of contrastive voice and the prominence of velar, uvular and glottal sounds. Syllables were simple or moderately complex.

The standard model of PM phonology has stood the test of time, but some uncertainties remain. The language was unwritten. It is believed that there were two dialects, one spoken in what is now Kuna, one in what is now Hekon. Little is known about them, however.

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Languages of Tekuo: a typological overview

Some basic statistics for the planet’s languages, compared with the languages of Earth.

It is estimated that there are some 6,000 to 7,000 languages here on Earth. Tekuo is only 80% the size of Earth and only 24% of it is land (compared with 29% of Earth). This land is less densely populated than Earth and divided into just 85 nation-states.

Not surprisingly then, Tekuo harbours fewer languages than our world. The effects of modern communications, education and nation-building lower the total further to just 624 natural languages.

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Lemohai: a linguistic overview

The main features of the language of Mohai, its history and status.

Lemohai is a contemporary language from the planet Tekuo. Its speakers are a race of Ike, who call themselves the Romohai. They are found mainly on the island of Mohai, though some moved to colonies abroad during the island’s Imperial Era.

There are some 15.6 million native speakers in all. Around 12.1 million live on Mohai, whilst the rest live in nearby countries, mostly in ports and large cities. Lemohai is widely studied as a second language across much of North-East Aheku.

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Proto-Maritime: a linguistic overview

Reconstructing an ancient tongue.

The Proto-Maritime language, ancestor of the Maritime language family, was spoken by the Proto-Maritime people who lived on the north-east coast of Aheku, a continent of the planet Tekuo.

The language arose as a result of the mixing of two cultures some three thousand years before the present (BP). Until that point, the coast and nearby islands were the sole preserve of the Cismontane peoples.

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