Tekuo: what and where?

How to get there, looking around and meeting the locals.

Tekuo is an Earth-like planet, inhabited by sentient hominids. It is a little smaller than our world and orbits its sun in 385.33 days. Its leading civilisations, like Mohai, are at a slightly higher level of development than ours.

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Languages of Tekuo: a typological overview

Some basic statistics for the planet’s languages, compared with the languages of Earth.

It is estimated that there are some 6,000 to 7,000 languages here on Earth. Tekuo is only 80% the size of Earth and only 24% of it is land (compared with 29% of Earth). This land is less densely populated than Earth and divided into just 85 nation-states.

Not surprisingly then, Tekuo harbours fewer languages than our world. The effects of modern communications, education and nation-building lower the total further to just 624 natural languages.

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Lemohai: a linguistic overview

The main features of the language of Mohai, its history and status.

Lemohai is a contemporary language from the planet Tekuo. Its speakers are a race of Ike, who call themselves the Romohai. They are found mainly on the island of Mohai, though some moved to colonies abroad during the island’s Imperial Era.

There are some 15.6 million native speakers in all. Around 12.1 million live on Mohai, whilst the rest live in nearby countries, mostly in ports and large cities. Lemohai is widely studied as a second language across much of North-East Aheku.

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The island of Mohai

Some basic information.

The island of Mohai lies to the east of the continent of Aheku on the planet Tekuo. It lies in the tropical zone and has a monsoon climate. It has an area of 162,350 square kilometres (62,683 square miles) and a population of 13.2 million. This works out at 81.8 people per square kilometre.

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What have the Romohai ever done for us?

The islanders’ contributions to the planet’s civilisation.

It is sometimes said on Tekuo that the Romohai are an inventive lot. This may or may not be the case, but if you have a good idea on Mohai, there’s a whole infrastructure to help you test it and bring it to market.

Workplaces are co-operative and non-hierarchical. Universities are integrated into society and the economy. Small, regional banks make their money by investing in new products and services rather than playing the stock exchange. This infrastructure has been exported to the former Romohai Empire.

What else though, have the Romohai contributed? The following are perhaps worth a mention:

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Proto-Maritime: a linguistic overview

Reconstructing an ancient tongue.

The Proto-Maritime language, ancestor of the Maritime language family, was spoken by the Proto-Maritime people who lived on the north-east coast of Aheku, a continent of the planet Tekuo.

The language arose as a result of the mixing of two cultures some three thousand years before the present (BP). Until that point, the coast and nearby islands were the sole preserve of the Cismontane peoples.

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Of tags and categories

How best to search this site.

This site may be searched with the use of tags and categories.

Categories divide posts into a few “big buckets”. These are intended for use in browsing. They are organised into hierarchies. They are used to sum up the main theme of a post. Only a limited number are applied to each post.

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Tekuo, astronomy and hard sums

Some basic information about the planet.

My study area lies on Tekuo, an Earth-like planet inhabited by sentient hominids. Tekuo is one of six planets orbiting a class G2 sun, known as Aiu. The first three planets in the system are rocky. Tekuo is the second of these. Three gas giants lie in the outer part of the system. Tekuo lies in the habitable zone.

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