Eastern Dahu : a linguistic overview

The modern Lemohai language is descended from Eastern Dahu, a language spoken on the island of Mohai and in Etsuri and Pekau, the nearest parts of mainland Aheku. ED was in turn descended from Dahu and ultimately Proto-Dahu-Kemba.

The Proto-Dahu-Kemba were a race of Ikhe, living in the north-east of Aheku. They then began a westward trek along the north coast. Archaeological evidence suggests the trek began around OH -186X (-1500 BC in our calendar).

Some PDK tribes reached what is now Pekau, others only went as far as modern Heiko. From this point on the speech of the two communities diverged, becoming separate Dahu and Kemba languages.

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Previously …

Readers may have noticed that I have added a new page to the site. The new page is titled Previous and is a record of the conlangs I created before the start of the Mohai project. Some of these have made it into the Mohai project. Files about a couple of earlier languages have also been embedded in the page. Why not take a closer look?

Time for a timeline (1)

Before we go much further, I think it’s time for an overview of the main linguistic, religious and political developments in the study area. The three are very much intertwined. Other topics will get their own timelines when the need arises.

Dates for events are given below in the Zayedin calendar. They are expressed as years before or after the Proclamation of the Faith in the year we call 1154 A.D. In the Zayedin calendar, this is Year Zero. It inaugurates Omun Zeikan, the Age of Light. Earlier dates are expressed negatively. These belong to Omun Hemwan, the Age of Error.

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Been redecorating (2)

As previously promised, I have now transited to a new look. I’m now using the new WordPress default theme, Twenty Sixteen. This has had to wait until WordPress 4.4 was available. 4.4 is the only version of WordPress that supports Twenty Sixteen. I like the new theme’s layout and it sounds good at a technical level, too.

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Not dead yet (1)

It looks like November 2015 will be the first month in which I don’t add anything to substantial to my Mohai blog. So I’m dropping by to say that this not because there’s anything wrong with me, or because I’ve given up on the blog, or anything.

Au Cointreau. There’s a lot of exciting developments behind the scenes. I’ve not been able to sign off any of it though, as one element depends on another.

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The sound of Lemohai dialects

There were seven dialects in Eastern Dahu, four of which were represented on Mohai. By the modern era these have reduced to three thanks to a mixture of education, broadcasting and increased travel. The three modern dialect areas are: Northern, Central and Southern. The Central dialect has most speakers.

The phonology of Modern Standard Lemohai (MSL) is based on educated speech from the capital Orisu and the surrounding area. This lies within the Central dialect zone, half way up the east coast.

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Been redecorating (1)

Alert readers will have noticed some changes to the colour scheme for this site lately. It should be stable now for a couple of months. I hope you like the new scheme. I think the white background gives the site more of a spacious feel and the other colours are closer to my original concept for the site – before I fell for the Decode theme.

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What does Lemohai sound like?

Vowels

Monophthongs

Modern Standard Lemohai has five oral monophthongs plus a nasal equivalent for each, making ten monophthongs in all.  Nasal monophthongs are written with a trailing nasal consonant.

Oral: a, e, i, o, u = /a, ɛ, i, ɔ, u /

Nasal: an, en, in, on, un

OR: am, em, im, om, um = /ã, ɛ̃, ĩ, ɔ̃, ũ/

Historical VN and CVN syllables gave rise to of the modern nasal vowels. Hence trailing -N are retained in the native script and in transliteration.

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